Mouth ulcers and X-linked CGD carriers

Carriers of X-linked CGD can sometimes develop painful mouth ulcers, also called ‘apthous’ ulcers or ‘canker sores’. They can be treated but may keep coming back.

Eight of 10 X-linked CGD carrier females who responded to our 2010 survey (of 35 people) suffered from recurring mouth ulcers.

This section helps explain how to treat mouth ulcers and what you can do to avoid them.

Avoiding mouth ulcers

The best way to avoid mouth ulcers is by cleaning your teeth twice a day and using an alcohol-free, anti-bacterial mouthwash containing chlorohexideine, such as Corsodyl. (Please be aware that using Corsydl over a long period of time can cause teeth discolouration.)

Treating mouth ulcers

Even if the mouth ulcers are painful, you need to keep cleaning your teeth and mouth. Use an alcohol-free, anti-bacterial mouthwash containing chlorohexideine, such as Corsodyl.

Another recommended solution is Orobase, a thick paste that protects the ulcers and allows them to heal. It can be very useful but should only be used for a maximum of five days. You must always check with your nurse or doctor before using Orobase, as it contains a mild steroid (Adcortyl).

Treating the pain associated with ulcers

If the ulcers are painful, you can use a sore mouth gel such Bonjela or the chemist’s own brand equivalent. Some gels are not suitable for children, so make sure you read the instruction leaflet carefully.

Alternatively, you can try Difflam mouth spray as a local anaesthetic or take painkillers. 

When they just won’t go away

Ulcers can be difficult to cure, so talk to your doctor or the specialist nurse if you’re concerned. There may be an underlying, on-going minor infection causing them that will need treating with antibiotics.

For specialist advice please contact our CGD Specialist nurse.